Rosie Stonham Vases

Previously a homeware designer, Rosie Stonham discovered glasswork while studying at the Royal College of Art. Her hand-blown vessels are informed by an interest in biology and the flow of matter between the body and the external world.

Rosie Stonham Small Membrane Vase

CAD 295.00
Pale Blue
Size: One Size

Medium Membrane vase by TOAST New Maker Rosie Stonham. Previously a homeware designer, she shifted her focus to glasswork while studying at the Royal College of Art. Her hand-blown vessels are informed by a keen interest in biology and the flow of matter between the body and the external world.

Part of her Membrane Glass collection, the vessel is created by blowing glass into a recycled mould made of scrunched-up newspaper. Its shiny finish is inspired by an imagined landscape within the body. Each varies slightly in shape and colour.

This item is part of our New Makers programme. In its sixth year, five makers demonstrating excellence in skill, originality and craftsmanship have been chosen by a TOAST panel. We offer business and marketing advice, as well as a platform to sell their pieces until the end of this year, with full profits being returned to them.

If you place an order today, it will be made for you and then sent to you directly from Rosie Stonham. Delivery is included in the price but, as this item is dispatched from the UK, import duties and local sales tax may be payable on receipt for countries outside of the UK. This is determined by the type of item you are ordering and the value. Please be aware that these charges are paid separately to the carrier and are not included in the price payable to TOAST, which only includes the item and delivery. Any charges paid on receipt are non-refundable should you choose to return the item.

Details

Hand wash. Glass.
Made in the United Kingdom.
Approx. H 12cm x W 9cm.

Delivery & Returns

Reviews

Rosie Stonham | Working with Glass

Rosie creates functional design objects that are informed by her interest in biology and the flow of matter between the body and the external world. In her London studio, Rosie creates her vessels by scrunching up old newspaper into rough moulds before blowing the glass by hand. As is the case with the human body, no two forms are alike. 

“The pieces examine consciousness and how the material of our bodies generates our immaterial inner life,” she explains. “I’m very interested in narrative expressed through objects.”

Meet Our New Makers 2024